Lancaster KB914 along with another squadron Lancaster of 405 (MR) Squadron, had been dispatched to Keflavik, Iceland for an anti-submarine exercise. On January 31, 1953 the two crews received orders to proceed to Goose Bay, Labrador, to search for a missing civilian Beechcraft Expeditor. They were to carry out a track crawl to Goose Bay, watching for the missing aircraft. The two Lancasters departed Keflavik February 1, 1953. The second Lancaster arrived safely at Goose Bay with their plane coated with ice. By the time that KB914 was approaching Goose Bay at 1526 hours local, the base was experiencing heavy snowfall with nil visibility and the GCA system was unserviceable. The aircraft was ordered to divert to Torbay, Newfoundland. The aircraft headed eastwards, but at 1630 local the pilot reported that two engines were feathered and he was returning to Goose Bay. They reported their position as approximately 52.00N, -58.00W and requested a weather update for Goose Bay. That was the last communication with KB914. Search called off 16 February 1953.

On June 15, 1953 the pilot of a DH Beaver of Laurentian Air Services, spotted the wreckage of KB914 at approximately 52.56N, 57.56W. An RCAF ground party reached the site on June 16th.

Investigation found that the propellers of the two inboard engines, No.2 and No.3, had been feathered. No.1, the left hand outboard engine did not appear to be operating at the moment of impact. Only No.4 right hand outboard engine was at full power.

When Nos. 2 and 3 engines were feathered, the pilot lost the use of some of his primary flight instruments and the hydraulic system. The No.1 engine probably failed due to icing as a result of engine carburetor intake shutters being inoperable because of the loss of hydraulics. That led to loss of control and the fatal crash of KB914. 9 crew members lost their lives.


Reproduced with permission from Aviation Safety Network

 SGT GARY BLIGHT RETIRES 

  AFTER MORE THAN 40 YEARS OF DISTINGUISHED SERVICE TO THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES (CAF) AND CANADA, SGT GARY BLIGHT WILL                   RETIRE  EFFECTIVE 26 FEB 2019. AN OPEN DEPARTURE WITH DIGNITY EVENT IS PLANNED TO CELEBRATE SGT BLIGHT S CAREER AT THE 14 WING       ANNAPOLIS MESS ON 27 FEB 2019 AT 1330 HRS IN THE TOW BAR.  ATTENDANCE, BEST WISHES AND OR ANEDOTES MAY BE PASSED ON TO              
Michael.carreira@forces.gc.ca  PRIOR TO 27 FEB 2019.


Another account about this accident by Hugh Halliday. Click Here

The crest of 405 Long Range Patrol Squadron depicts an eagle's head facing to the sinister and holding in the beak a sprig of maple. Its motto refers to the fact that this was the first and only Royal Canadian Air Force  Pathfinder squadron. The eagle's head which faces the sinister suggests leadership, is derived from the pathfinder badge

Motto: Ducimus - We Lead

1 February Marks the 66th Anniversary of the Crash of

405 Squadron Lancaster KB914 

WELCOME TO THE 405 SQUADRON ASSOCIATION

The Association is open at any ground and air crew as well as civilians who worked on the Squadron since 1942

Membership Form